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Training Support Center Hampton Roads
NAS Oceana Dam Neck AnnexNAS Oceana logo

TSC Hampton Roads is located at NAS Oceana, Dam Neck Annex. Dam Neck is located in an area rich in history. In 1607, the Jamestown colonists landed just south of the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay at what is now Fort Story. By 1617, the settlers expanded east of the Elizabeth River, and built homes near present-day Dam Neck by the 1630's.

The name Dam Neck became firmly established in 1881 when it was given to a life-saving station built where the Bachelor Officer Quarters are now located.The Coast Guard purchased the life-saving station in 1930, and used it as a signal station until the Navy bought the land during World War II.

On November 6, 1941, Lieutenant Phillip D. Gallery received orders to report to the "Anti-Aircraft Range, Norfolk."No one could tell him anything about his new duty station, so Gallery did some checking.He discovered that District Public Works was in the process of constructing two small frame buildings near a Coast Guard station about five miles south of Virginia Beach on the Atlantic coast.This was the beginning of Anti-Aircraft Range, Norfolk.

The base originally housed a firing line, one control tower, one magazine, one office and one shop. There were no quarters or messing facilities.
Picture of one of the first crews at Dam Neck
On April 4, 1942, the activity was commissioned as the Anti-Aircraft Training and Test center with Lieutenant Gallery as Commanding Officer.The first barracks building, a mess hall and early classrooms were completed, and the staff consisted of two officers and approximately 40 enlisted men.

Lieutenant Gallery solicited trainees from ships at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard and the Naval Base Piers.Enormous interest in the center developed immediately after the assault on Pearl Harbor, and plans were made to establish many other similar activities throughout the nation.

By 1944, Lieutenant Gallery was promoted to the rank of commander, and was awarded the Legion of Merit for his initiative and service to the Anti-Aircraft Range.He went on to become Commanding Officer of U S S Pittsburgh during the Korean conflict, and retired as Rear Admiral.

Before and during World War II, several shipwrecks occurred off the Virginia Beach Coast.
Picture of a beached ship One is marked by a quick, flashing red buoy located nine miles east of the drone launching pad and labeled "Dam Neck Wreck Lighted Bell Buoy."The 5,700-ton U.S. tanker TIGER was torpedoed and sunk there by a submarine on April 3, 1942 with 64,000 barrels of Navy fuel oil aboard.

After World War II, the fate of Dam Neck was in question for several years.All of the anti-aircraft training centers in the United States were closing, but somehow Dam Neck survived.Between the years 1945 and 1949, the center rested uneasily in a stagnant period expecting each year to be its last.Then a Fire Department was established at the center in March 1947, giving hope to the staff that the base would remain commissioned.

Operational training continues today on all major weapons systems.As newer systems have been introduced to the fleet, they have been added to an ever-expanding curriculum, keeping the training tradition alive at Dam Neck.

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Naval Station NorfolkNAVSTANORVA logo

Naval Station Norfolk occupies about 4,300 acres of Hampton Roads real estate in a peninsula known as Sewells Point. It is the world's largest Naval Station; in fact, based on supported military population, it is the largest naval installation in the world. When the 75 ships and 134 aircraft homeported here are not at sea, they are along side one of the 13 piers or inside one of the 11 aircraft hangars for repair, refit, training and to provide the ship's or squadron's crew an opportunity to be with their families. Naval Station is homeport to aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, large amphibious ships, submarines, a variety of supply and logistics ships, C-2, C-9, C-12 and E-2 fixed wing aircraft, H-3,H-46, H-53, and H-60 helicopters.p>

Port Services controls more than 3,100 ships' movements annually as they arrive and depart their berths. Port facilities extend more than four miles along the waterfront and include some seven miles of pier and wharf space.

Air Operations conducts over 100,000 flight operations each year, an average of 275 flights per day or one every six minutes. Over 150,000 passengers and 264,000 tons of mail and cargo depart annually on Air Mobility Command (AMC) aircraft and other chartered flights from our airfield. It is the hub for Navy logistics going to the European and Central Command theaters of operations, and to the Caribbean.

Naval Station's Nimitz Hall is a major stopping-off point for people destined for ships, aircraft squadrons, and stations overseas. Nearly 9,000 people are processed through the Transient Personnel Unit annually en route to their destinations.

land on which Naval Station is located was originally the site of the 1907 Jamestown Exposition. During this exposition, high-ranking naval officers agreed that this site was ideal for a naval activity. A bill was passed in 1908 proposing Congress to allow $1 million for the purchase of the property and buildings, but it died when the Assistant Secretary of the Navy was given a choice between this property and a new coal ship. He replied that a new ship was an absolute necessity. However, immediately after the United States entered World War I in April 1917, the Secretary of the Navy was persuaded to buy the property. A bill was passed for the purchase of 474 acres; it set aside the sum of $1.2 million as payment for the property and an additional $1.6 million for the development of the base, including piers, aviation facilities, storehouses, facilities for fuel and oil storage, a recruit training station, a submarine base and recreation grounds for fleet personnel. Rear Admiral Dillingham was assigned the task of coordinating the area's development.

Construction of the training camp began on Independence Day 1917, and within the first 30 days housing for 7,500 men had been completed. The next six months saw the establishment of the 5th Naval District Headquarters and the Naval Operating Base, which included the Naval Training Center, Naval Air Station, Naval Hospital and Submarine Station. By Armistice Day 1918, there were 34,000 enlisted men at the base. When the available land became insufficient, a large part of the flats on the west and north were filled from dredging done to allow large ships to dock. During the fall and winter of 1917, approximately 8 million cubic yards of dredging took place.

After the Second World War, the air side of the station continued to operate at near peak levels as well. It served as operational headquarters for the Fleet Air Command, and with the emergence of NAS Oceana as a "master jet airfield" in the late 1950's, the tandem formed the nucleus of the biggest air base on the East Coast. The air station would be known as Naval Air Station Norfolk throughout the postwar period. In 1967 it came under the control of Command Naval Air Force, Atlantic.

The Norfolk facility remained the chief supplier of aircraft parts and a major rework plant. Classified as "industrial," the station employed about 7,500 civilians in 1946. In one postwar year the Navy invested $36 million in the overhaul and repair plant alone. The average annual payroll in the last had of the 1950's came to nearly $45 million. By 1976, the air rework plant covered 174 acres and included 175 buildings. In the 1970's and 1980's its workers restored or repaired, among other craft, F-14 Tomcats, A-6 Intruders, and F-8 Crusaders. From June 1980 until June 1981, the air station handled over 135,478 aircraft operations, 29,832 tons of air cargo, and 132,000 passengers. In 1996, as part of the Congressional "Base Realignment and Closure" (BRAC) process this plant, known by this time as the Naval Aviation Depot Norfolk, closed its doors.

The air station, at one time, was host to more than 70 tenant commands, including several carrier groups, carrier airborne early warning wings, helicopter sea control wings, and Naval Air Reserve units. In addition, the station rendered support in photography, meteorology, and electronics to the fleet commands of the Hampton Roads naval community. The Naval Air Station also responded to national times of stress, such as Operation Sincere Welcome in 1994, when 2,000 civilian workers, dependents, and non-essential military personnel were evacuated to Norfolk from Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba. This influx of people was an instance of history repeating itself, as the station also welcomed evacuees during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962.

One other milestone in NAS's history occurred in 1968 when the station assumed a major role in putting a man on the moon. The air station became Recovery Control Center Atlantic, providing command, control and communications with all the ships and aircraft involved in the recovery operations of Apollo 7.

On 6 August 1974, the Navy held a groundbreaking ceremony for the first construction project on 494.8 acres of land acquired that year from Norfolk and Western Railway at a cost of $17.4 million. The $60 million construction program resulted in new piers along the waterfront; beautification and improvements to Hampton Boulevard leading to Gate 2 (the main gate), and the widening of Taussig Boulevard to a 4-lane highway; and new warehouses.

Also in 1974, the Commanding Officer, Captain Paul L. Merwin, was instrumental in creating improvements to benefit the sailors. These included additions such as laundramat services, telephones, and additional lighting to improve security. In addition, Captain Merwin was responsible for purchasing land outside the gates and ensuring that area businesses were more sailor-friendly than they had been. He was instrumental in joining the separate sets of piers. Previously, one had to exit one gate and enter another to travel from piers 2-12 and 20-25.

Always seeking to provide the best service to its customers, the Naval Station has evolved and made necessary and/or convenient improvements such as the Navy Exchange Mall, which was opened at its present location in November 1989 and expanded again by another 189,000 sq. ft. in September 1998. Another momentous occasion in 1998 was the opening of Enterprise Hall, a new state-of-the-art bachelor housing building, centrally located in the heart of the Naval Station next to the Naval Station Galley.

As part of the Navy's response to the post-Cold War drawdown of the 1990's, many new initiatives were implemented at Navy shore installations to reduce their operating cost, improve their efficiency, and better match their capacity to the reduced size of the Navy. In 1998, the Navy began a major realignment of shore command organizations and processes throughout Hampton Roads in a process known as "regionalization". One of the biggest steps and efficiencies in this process was the merger of separate Naval Station and Naval Air Station (which were directly adjacent to each other) into a single installation to be called Naval Station Norfolk. This consolidation became official on February 5, 1999.

This history above compiled from the following Resources:
"An Illustrated History of the Jamestown Exposition," by Hampton Roads Naval Museum
"History of Naval Station Norfolk 1917-1988" by NAVSTA PAO Staff
The "Daybook", Volume 4, Issue 1, "The Navy Builds a Home" by Joe Judge and Gordon Calhoun,Hampton Roads Naval Museum
"History of NAS" unknown author, from NAS Web Site page, history.html (no longer on internet) "NAS Norfolk in World War II" by Joe Mosier, Docent, Hampton Roads Naval Museum
"NAS Norfolk after WWII" by Hampton Roads Naval Museum
"Now or Never - Ely and Hudson Flyer make historic flight off Birmingham" by Tom Hesse
Articles by Mr. Joe Mosier, Hampton Roads Naval Museum
An article in "The Flagship" by Lamar Raker.

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Areas of this web page link to other Web Information Systems providing security-related information which are operated by other government organizations, commercial firms, educational institutions, and private parties. We have no control over the information on those systems which may be objectionable or which may not otherwise conform to Department of Navy policies. Unless otherwise noted, some of the Sites listed within the pages of this server are provided by organizations outside the Navy Domain. These links are offered as a convenience and for informational purposes only. Their inclusion here does not constitute an endorsement or an approval by the Department of the Navy of any of the products, services, or opinions of the external providers. The Department of the Navy bears no responsibility for the accuracy or the content of external sites. They are included here because they provide information on web site "accessibility" issues and products not readily available elsewhere.
NAS Oceana Master Jet BaseNAS Oceana logo

NAS Oceana Master Jet Base entrance There were a quarter of a million takeoffs and landings at Naval Air Station Oceana last year. Over six miles of runways set the stage for this Master Jet Base serving the station’s assigned squadrons and transient military air traffic.

Fighter aircract and squadron personnel at NAS Oceana Master Jet Base In November 1940, the U.S. Government purchased about 328.95 acres of land and constructed a small airfield to serve as an auxiliary field to Norfolk’s military complex. In 1943, Oceana was commissioned as a Naval Auxiliary Air Station.

By 1952, Oceana was designated a Naval Air Station and by 1953, was an all weather air station. In 1957 NAS Oceana was officially designated as a Master Jet Base.

Over the years Oceana has grown to more than 16 times its original size. Today the complex consists of nearly 6,000 acres and employs more than 11,000 navy personnel.

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Notice Regarding External Links:
Areas of this web page link to other Web Information Systems providing security-related information which are operated by other government organizations, commercial firms, educational institutions, and private parties. We have no control over the information on those systems which may be objectionable or which may not otherwise conform to Department of Navy policies. Unless otherwise noted, some of the Sites listed within the pages of this server are provided by organizations outside the Navy Domain. These links are offered as a convenience and for informational purposes only. Their inclusion here does not constitute an endorsement or an approval by the Department of the Navy of any of the products, services, or opinions of the external providers. The Department of the Navy bears no responsibility for the accuracy or the content of external sites. They are included here because they provide information on web site "accessibility" issues and products not readily available elsewhere.

NSA Norfolk and NSA Northwest Annex NSA Norfolk logo

Naval Support Activity supplies support functions and services to elegible personnel in support of installation commanders, resident commands, base populations, retirees and navy families in the mid atlantic region.

NSA Northwest was established in 1975, and is south of Chesapeake, Va., about 40 minutes from the Norfolk Naval Base. There are three Navy barracks: one for enlisted permanent party personnel, the Marine barracks solely for Marine Corps Security Force Training Company students, and the USCG barracks.

NSA Norfolk Northwest Annex arial The base's tenant commands include representation from all military services and the Coast Guard. Tenants include the Capt. William L. McConagle Branch Medical/Dental Clinic; Electronic Warfare Operational Programming Facility; Fleet Surveillance Support Command; NATO Satellite Ground Terminal F-3; Navy Satellite Communications Facility; Naval Computer Telecommunications Area Master Station Special Communications Division NW; Navy Family Services Center Northwest; US Coast Guard Communications Area Master Station Atlantic; USMC Security Force Training Company.

Theland on which Naval Station is located was originally the site of the 1907 Jamestown Exposition. During this exposition, high-ranking naval officers agreed that this site was ideal for a naval activity. A bill was passed in 1908 proposing Congress to allow $1 million for the purchase of the property and buildings, but it died when the Assistant Secretary of the Navy was given a choice between this property and a new coal ship. He replied that a new ship was an absolute necessity. However, immediately after the United States entered World War I in April 1917, the Secretary of the Navy was persuaded to buy the property. A bill was passed for the purchase of 474 acres; it set aside the sum of $1.2 million as payment for the property and an additional $1.6 million for the development of the base, including piers, aviation facilities, storehouses, facilities for fuel and oil storage, a recruit training station, a submarine base and recreation grounds for fleet.

Today, Naval Station Norfolk occupies about 4,300 acres of Hampton Roads real estate in a peninsula known as Sewells Point. It is the world's largest Naval Station; in fact, based on supported military population, it is the largest naval installation in the world. When the 75 ships and 134 aircraft home-ported here are not at sea, they are along side one of the 13 piers or inside one of the 11 aircraft hangars for repair, refit, training and to provide the ship's or squadron's crew an opportunity to be with their families. Naval Station is homeport to aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, large amphibious ships, submarines, a variety of supply and logistics ships, C-2, C-9, C-12 and E-2 fixed wing aircraft,and H-3,H-46, H-53, and H-60 helicopters.

Port Services controls more than 3,100 ships' movements annually as they arrive and depart their berths. Port facilities extend more than four miles along the waterfront and include some seven miles of pier and wharf space.

Air Operations conducts over 100,000 flight operations each year, an average of 275 flights per day or one every six minutes. Over 150,000 passengers and 264,000 tons of mail and cargo depart annually on Air Mobility Command (AMC) aircraft and other chartered flights from our airfield. It is the hub for Navy logistics going to the European and Central Command theaters of operations, and to the Caribbean.

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Notice Regarding External Links:
Areas of this web page link to other Web Information Systems providing security-related information which are operated by other government organizations, commercial firms, educational institutions, and private parties. We have no control over the information on those systems which may be objectionable or which may not otherwise conform to Department of Navy policies. Unless otherwise noted, some of the Sites listed within the pages of this server are provided by organizations outside the Navy Domain. These links are offered as a convenience and for informational purposes only. Their inclusion here does not constitute an endorsement or an approval by the Department of the Navy of any of the products, services, or opinions of the external providers. The Department of the Navy bears no responsibility for the accuracy or the content of external sites. They are included here because they provide information on web site "accessibility" issues and products not readily available elsewhere.

Joint Expeditionary Base(JEB) Little Creek - Fort Story JEB Little Creek - FT Story logo

On July 16, 1942, a Navy truck drove off the scenic Ocean View-Virginia Beach highway and stopped in a waterlogged bean field of the Whitehurst farm. For days thereafter, trucks loaded with lumber and equipment rolled into the area in almost continuous succession.

The reason for this mass assault in a bean field 12 miles northeast of Norfolk was that early in World War II Navy planners saw a necessity for landing large numbers of American troops on foreign shores in the face of enemy gunfire.

During the early phases of World War II the base was literally a combination of farmland and swamps. Four bases were constructed on this area-Camp Bradford, Camp Shelton, U.S. Naval Frontier Base, and Amphibious Training Base.

Camps Bradford and Shelton were named for the former owners of the land. At first Camp Bradford was a training base for Navy Seabees, but in 1943 it was changed into a training center for the crews of LSTs (landing ship tank).\

Shelton was an armed guard training center for bluejackets serving on board merchant ships as gun crews. At the end of World War II it served as a separation center.

The Frontier Base was the forwarding center for Amphibious Force personnel and equipment destined for the European Theater. The Amphibious Training Base (also known as "Little Creek") was the center for all types of amphibious training and the training of ship's crews for LSM (landing ship medium), LCI (landing craft infantry), and LCU (landing craft utility); LCM (landing craft mechanized), and LCVP (landing craft vehicle, personnel) boat crews were also trained at Little Creek.

The early days were hard ones. Techniques of training had to be developed from scratch. Facilities for the upkeep of equipment as well as living facilities for personnel were primitive. The newcomers found few buildings and practically no roads or utilities--just bean vines. The men assigned found it difficult to get their white uniforms clean because there was so much foreign matter in the water; there was no such luxury as hot water so the men had to do their best with cold water and soap powder. After various improvisations along came temporary buildings that were later to give the site some resemblance to a naval base.

The men worked long hours in blistering heat in the summer and the penetrating wet cold of winter. They worked in mud and sand. After long hours of training many of them performed extra duties on their own initiative which slowly resulted in improved living conditions.

In a few months, the trained men who were to land fighting forces from Africa to Normandy were ready for sea. During World War II over 200,000 naval personnel and 160,000 Army and Marine Corps personnel trained at Little Creek.

The four bases were partially inactivated at the end of hostilities of World War II. Shortly thereafter, however, the bases at Little Creek, because of their central location on the Atlantic coast, excellent and varied beach conditions, proximity to the naval facilities of Norfolk, berthing facilities for amphibious ships through the size of LSTs, and other advantages, were consolidated into the present installation and renamed the Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek with a commissioning date of August 10, 1945. It was designated a permanent base in 1946.

Growing over the years to meet the needs of the Amphibious Force, the base has developed into one of the most modern in the Navy. Thousands of men and women from all branches of the Armed Forces, as well as military students from foreign nations, now pass through the gates of the Naval Amphibious Base yearly for training in amphibious warfare.

Amphibious warfare adds a crucial measure of leverage to conducting a maritime campaign successfully. National maritime strategy seeks to deter war if at all possible, but if deterrence fails, to destroy enemy maritime forces, protect allied sea lines of communication, support the land campaign, and secure JEB Little Creek - FT Story arial favorable leverage for termination of hostilities. It is a truly global strategy, requiring the ability to dominate the world's oceans and the flexibility of force employment that only naval forces can provide. Naval forces are viewed as central elements of American military strategy. The Navy/Marine Corps team provides an effective amphibious striking arm in support of the national military strategy. Today nearly 13,000 Sailors, Marines, and civilian employees are assigned to the various stations or attend schools at the Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek in support of the Navy/Marine Corps team.

The Joint Expeditionary Base(JEB) Little Creek - Fort Story is the major operating base for the Amphibious Forces in the United States Atlantic Fleet. The base is comprised of four locations in three states, including almost 12,000 acres of real estate. Its Little Creek location adjacent to U.S. Highway 60 totals 2,120 acres of land. Outlying facilities include 350 acres at Camp Pendleton south of Virginia Beach and 21 acres known as Radio Island at Morehead City, N.C., used as an amphibious embarkation/debarkation area for U.S. Marine Corps units at Camp Lejeune, N.C.

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Areas of this web page link to other Web Information Systems providing security-related information which are operated by other government organizations, commercial firms, educational institutions, and private parties. We have no control over the information on those systems which may be objectionable or which may not otherwise conform to Department of Navy policies. Unless otherwise noted, some of the Sites listed within the pages of this server are provided by organizations outside the Navy Domain. These links are offered as a convenience and for informational purposes only. Their inclusion here does not constitute an endorsement or an approval by the Department of the Navy of any of the products, services, or opinions of the external providers. The Department of the Navy bears no responsibility for the accuracy or the content of external sites. They are included here because they provide information on web site "accessibility" issues and products not readily available elsewhere.