CSFE: Celebrating the Navy Seabee Birthday on March 5

07 March 2022

From NETC PAO

On March 5, the U.S. Navy commemorates the establishment of the Seabees by remembering their heritage and extensive contributions to naval history during the past 80 years and recognizing their important mission today.
PENSACOLA, Fla. -- On March 5, the U.S. Navy commemorates the establishment of the Seabees by remembering their heritage and extensive contributions to naval history during the past 80 years and recognizing their important mission today.

Every enlisted Seabee starts their career after boot camp by attending construction “A” schools managed by the Center for Seabees and Facilities Engineering (CSFE), where they learn the essential skills and knowledge to support their career growth and fleet readiness.

“Since our inception 80 years ago, U.S. Navy Seabees have been present in every war and conflict since World War II,” said Capt. Peter Maculan, commanding officer, CSFE and the Naval Civil Engineer Corps Officers School. “The Seabees are providing tactical/expeditionary engineering expertise in remote locations around the world in support of the fleet and our nation’s priorities.”

200415-N-N0443-0003 GULFPORT, Miss. (April 15, 2020) Construction Electrician C-1 Advanced Class 20020 staff and students maintain physical distancing during a pole climbing exercise at Naval Construction Training Center Gulfport, Mississippi, as they follow CDC guidelines to the extent applicable as part of the training center's proactive approach to combat COVID-19. Construction electricians build, maintain and operate power production facilities and electrical distribution systems for naval installations and support the Navy and Marine Corps operational and expeditionary forces worldwide. (U.S. Navy photo)
200415-N-N0443-0003 GULFPORT, Miss. (April 15, 2020) Construction Electrician C-1 Advanced Class 20020 staff and students maintain physical distancing during a pole climbing exercise at Naval Construction Training Center Gulfport, Mississippi, as they follow CDC guidelines to the extent applicable as part of the training center's proactive approach to combat COVID-19. Construction electricians build, maintain and operate power production facilities and electrical distribution systems for naval installations and support the Navy and Marine Corps operational and expeditionary forces worldwide. (U.S. Navy photo)
200415-N-N0443-0003 GULFPORT, Miss. (April 15, 2020) Construction Electrician C-1 Advanced Class 20020 staff and students maintain physical distancing during a pole climbing exercise at Naval Construction Training Center Gulfport, Mississippi, as they follow CDC guidelines to the extent applicable as part of the training center's proactive approach to combat COVID-19. Construction electricians build, maintain and operate power production facilities and electrical distribution systems for naval installations and support the Navy and Marine Corps operational and expeditionary forces worldwide. (U.S. Navy photo)
200415-N-N0443-0003
200415-N-N0443-0003 GULFPORT, Miss. (April 15, 2020) Construction Electrician C-1 Advanced Class 20020 staff and students maintain physical distancing during a pole climbing exercise at Naval Construction Training Center Gulfport, Mississippi, as they follow CDC guidelines to the extent applicable as part of the training center's proactive approach to combat COVID-19. Construction electricians build, maintain and operate power production facilities and electrical distribution systems for naval installations and support the Navy and Marine Corps operational and expeditionary forces worldwide. (U.S. Navy photo)
Photo By: Carla McCarthy
VIRIN: 200415-N-N0443-0003
A military’s capacity to build, maintain and break down infrastructure in hostile environments can play a pivotal role during wartime. As World War II raged across the Pacific, Rear Adm. Ben Moreell recognized the need for combat-trained Navy construction units and petitioned for authority to establish the Naval Construction Force, also known as the Seabees, to work under command of the Civil Engineer Corps.

Notably, during World War II, Seabees served on naval combat demolition units and were among the first ashore at Normandy on D-Day, responsible for dismantling the German-built barriers designed to prevent amphibious landings. Throughout our history, Seabees have worked tirelessly supporting the Korean War, Vietnam War and Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.

The Seabees’ unusual name comes from the pronunciation of C.B. for "construction battalions." This inspired the Seabee logo, which depicts a buzzing bee holding construction tools and a rifle.

Working under the motto "Construimus, Batuimus," meaning, "We Build, We Fight," the Navy Seabees do exactly that.

Today, Seabees provide the Navy an unconventional asset found nowhere else in the U.S. military. They dedicate their unmatched highly specialized trade skills and military prowess to protect our nation and are consistently involved in public works projects, disaster recovery initiatives and humanitarian efforts, even in times of peace.

190419-N-N0443-1002.jpg
190419-N-N0443-1002 GULFPORT, Miss. (April 19, 2019) Students attending the Construction Mechanic “C-1” Advanced School at Naval Construction Training Center Gulfport learn how to properly identify components, troubleshoot and recondition the Allison model 4700SP transmission, used in a wide variety of applications across the Naval Construction Force. The 4000 series Allison is used in the Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement (MTVR), Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles, and in every other medium/heavy duty vehicle that has an automatic transmission. (U.S. Navy photo by Construction Mechanic 2nd Class Steven Peterson/Released)
190419-N-N0443-1002.jpg
190419-N-N0443-1002
190419-N-N0443-1002 GULFPORT, Miss. (April 19, 2019) Students attending the Construction Mechanic “C-1” Advanced School at Naval Construction Training Center Gulfport learn how to properly identify components, troubleshoot and recondition the Allison model 4700SP transmission, used in a wide variety of applications across the Naval Construction Force. The 4000 series Allison is used in the Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement (MTVR), Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles, and in every other medium/heavy duty vehicle that has an automatic transmission. (U.S. Navy photo by Construction Mechanic 2nd Class Steven Peterson/Released)
Photo By: Carla McCarthy
VIRIN: 190419-N-N0443-1002
CSFE trains today’s Seabees as builders, construction electricians, construction mechanics, engineering aids, equipment operators, steelworkers and utilitiesmen at schoolhouses in California, Mississippi, Texas and Missouri.

“It is a great honor and privilege for our entire CSFE domain to be charged with the training to enhance warfighting lethality and leadership in expeditionary construction,” said Maculan.

We build, We fight, We win!

CSFE designs, delivers, evaluates, and maintains construction, facilities engineering, and environmental training coupled with character development that enhances warfighting lethality and leadership capabilities in expeditionary construction and facilities management.

To learn more about CSFE, visit http://www.netc.navy.mil/CSFE/.

To learn more about Seabee history, visit https://www.history.navy.mil/browse-by-topic/communities/seabees1.html.
 
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